Metro[nome]
What makes Washington, DC tick?

This thesis exploration will examine the Districts public spaces and transportation infrastructure to be reimagined as an integrated network of communities that comprise the city and its greater metro area.

My name is Michael Kulikowski and I am a 5th year architecture student at Virginia Tech. This tumblelog will be a documentation of my thesis journey - including everything from images that inspire me to sketches I've produced along the way.
Metro[nome]
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Enter: The Real World
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pabloraw:

Bright and early
for their daily races
going nowhere
going nowhere
© Pablo BenaventeAll Rights Reserved
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transitmaps:

Historical Map: “Opening Day” Washington, DC Metro Map, 1976
Directly related to yesterday’s post, here’s an even older map of the Washington, DC Metro — this one is from an informational pamphlet released for the March 29, 1976 opening of the first part of the system, and is clearly dated at he bottom right.
Inexplicably, the Red Line is a dark burgundy colour, while the Orange Line is shown as red, even though they’re both clearly labelled correctly in the legend. How a printing error of this magnitude occurred is beyond me: with four-colour printing, you’d have to add about 40 percent more magenta ink to turn orange into red, and turning red into burgundy requires the addition of a lot of black ink where absolutely none should exist. Totally bizarre!
In another difference from yesterday’s map, you can see that neither Dupont Circle or Gallery Place are open for business yet.
Finally, long time correspondent Matt Johnson — who knows more about the Washington Metro than I ever will — has sent in some interesting information regarding some of the alignments shown on these old maps.  I noted yesterday that these old maps don’t have the distinctive kink in the Yellow/Green line near U Street — Matt tells me that’s because at this time there wasn’t planned to be one.
As shown, the plan was for the Green and Yellow Lines to continue directly north from 7th Street into Georgia Avenue (the northern extension of 7th Street) to Kansas Avenue and then on to the current alignment at Fort Totten. Later changes pushed the alignment across to 14th Street and then along New Hampshire Avenue to Fort Totten. And thus, a distinctive visual feature of the modern map was born (and here was I thinking that they put it in to accommodate the ridiculous length of U Street station’s current name!)
Matt also notes that the southern end of the Green Line was changed over time to something of a “hybrid” alignment. Originally, he says, the Green Line was to go to Rosecroft via Congress Heights. By the 1970s, that had changed, and the new plan was to send the line to Branch Avenue via Alabama Avenue, as shown on this map.
However, a lawsuit was brought that WMATA had not held public hearings in the DC area, and as a result a hybrid alignment was chosen. In DC, the line went via Congress Heights (as if it was going to Rosecroft). In Prince George’s the line headed for Branch Avenue. At the District Line, there’s a kink to connect the two different alignments. 
Strangely, that kink only appeared on the official map with the recent Rush+ revision, even though it’s always physically been there!
(Source: later in the same Subchat.com thread from yesterday)


The map looked so much better without all the black and it’s still readable without it… I know that here it’s to denote that those stations were not yet open, but it’s so much cleaner they should bring it back!
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Let the illustrato and photoshopping commence on ze Megasection!
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lemanoosh:

Morocco - Menara airport 
lemanoosh:

Morocco - Menara airport 
lemanoosh:

Morocco - Menara airport 
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While on Spring Break in NYC and DC I conducted a few studies of various transit nodes. I’m at a point in my project where the spatial connection to each mode of transit is not exactly as I’ve intended. The break allowed me to take a step back at how I had been approaching it to reconsider it in a different way. These sketches are documentation of how I experienced the various approaches used at these different nodes.
The first is the Atlantic Avenue Terminal/Barclays Center Station. This particular entrance/exit was designed by SHoP as part of the Barclays Center Project. Upon exiting there is a powerfully framed view of the stadium (which has been exaggerated in this sketch). The exit then spills out into the plaza which the cantilever and oculus sit above.
The second is Grand Central Terminal. A classical and iconic example of a transit node. The section is quite complex, filled with various modes of transit, access ramps, and other circulation spaces, most of which connect through the grand hall. It is a fantastic space which elegantly captures the energy and moment of people as they flow through its spaces.
The last is South Ferry Terminal at Battery Park. Two subway lines, and a couple dozen bus routes connect here to the Staten Island Ferry. The solution to connect these otherwise disparate modes is rather simple but effective. A sprawling awning reaches out like tentacles from the Ferry Hall to the subway entrances and bus platform. The awning provide a covered shelter while also directing the flow of people into the ferry hall. The “Staten Island Ferry” lettering atop the awning serve to create an iconic entrance at the tip of Manhattan.
While on Spring Break in NYC and DC I conducted a few studies of various transit nodes. I’m at a point in my project where the spatial connection to each mode of transit is not exactly as I’ve intended. The break allowed me to take a step back at how I had been approaching it to reconsider it in a different way. These sketches are documentation of how I experienced the various approaches used at these different nodes.
The first is the Atlantic Avenue Terminal/Barclays Center Station. This particular entrance/exit was designed by SHoP as part of the Barclays Center Project. Upon exiting there is a powerfully framed view of the stadium (which has been exaggerated in this sketch). The exit then spills out into the plaza which the cantilever and oculus sit above.
The second is Grand Central Terminal. A classical and iconic example of a transit node. The section is quite complex, filled with various modes of transit, access ramps, and other circulation spaces, most of which connect through the grand hall. It is a fantastic space which elegantly captures the energy and moment of people as they flow through its spaces.
The last is South Ferry Terminal at Battery Park. Two subway lines, and a couple dozen bus routes connect here to the Staten Island Ferry. The solution to connect these otherwise disparate modes is rather simple but effective. A sprawling awning reaches out like tentacles from the Ferry Hall to the subway entrances and bus platform. The awning provide a covered shelter while also directing the flow of people into the ferry hall. The “Staten Island Ferry” lettering atop the awning serve to create an iconic entrance at the tip of Manhattan.
While on Spring Break in NYC and DC I conducted a few studies of various transit nodes. I’m at a point in my project where the spatial connection to each mode of transit is not exactly as I’ve intended. The break allowed me to take a step back at how I had been approaching it to reconsider it in a different way. These sketches are documentation of how I experienced the various approaches used at these different nodes.
The first is the Atlantic Avenue Terminal/Barclays Center Station. This particular entrance/exit was designed by SHoP as part of the Barclays Center Project. Upon exiting there is a powerfully framed view of the stadium (which has been exaggerated in this sketch). The exit then spills out into the plaza which the cantilever and oculus sit above.
The second is Grand Central Terminal. A classical and iconic example of a transit node. The section is quite complex, filled with various modes of transit, access ramps, and other circulation spaces, most of which connect through the grand hall. It is a fantastic space which elegantly captures the energy and moment of people as they flow through its spaces.
The last is South Ferry Terminal at Battery Park. Two subway lines, and a couple dozen bus routes connect here to the Staten Island Ferry. The solution to connect these otherwise disparate modes is rather simple but effective. A sprawling awning reaches out like tentacles from the Ferry Hall to the subway entrances and bus platform. The awning provide a covered shelter while also directing the flow of people into the ferry hall. The “Staten Island Ferry” lettering atop the awning serve to create an iconic entrance at the tip of Manhattan.
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MTA Transitional from Michael Kulikowski on Vimeo.

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Metro Transitional from Michael Kulikowski on Vimeo.